What is Apnea Sleep Disorder?

What is apnea sleep disorder

SLEEP apnea is a common disorder in which you experience one or more pauses or reductions in breathing or shallow breaths during sleep. These breathing pauses usually last between 8 to 15 seconds, sometimes longer, and can happen more than a hundred times while you are sleeping. Health experts blame the disorder as the main culprit for insomnia.

In most instances, normal breathing resumes, sometimes in a choking sound or loud snort. When regular breathing is temporarily interrupted, you are derailed off your natural sleep tracks. As a result, you spend more hours in faint sleep and very little moment in restorative sleep that people need to be mentally alert and physically active the following day.

The disorder, if left untreated, keeps you from enjoying a healthy night’s sleep which is very important in your overall mental and physical well-being. Chronic deprivation of sleep results in poor concentration, sluggishness, slow reflex, heightened risk of accidents, and daytime drowsiness.

Sleep apnea can also cause health problems over a certain period of time, including weight gain, insomnia, stroke, heart disease, hypertension and even diabetes.  But with early medical intervention, the symptoms can be controlled and allow you to get long normal sleeps and start to relish what it is like to feel reinvigorated and sharp every day.

Sleep apnea is normally a chronic malady that muddles your state of slumber. A person with the condition is often jolted out of deep sleep and into light sleep when their regular breathing pattern is disrupted or becomes superficial. The outcome is miserable sleep quality that makes the person feeling very feeble during his waking hours.

This form of sleep disturbance usually goes undiagnosed. Medical experts often can not detect the ailment during regular office visits. Also, sleep apnea does not require any blood testing.

Sleep apnea is very rare among children but common among grownups. Although a diagnosis of the disorder is often based on a person’s medical background, there are various types of tests that can be applied to validate the diagnosis. Treatment can be either non-surgical or surgical.

Majority of those who suffer from insomnia brought about by sleep apnea do not realize that they already have it simply because the disruption only takes place when they are sleeping. A member of the family or partner in bed is usually the first person who notices the symptoms of sleep apnea.

Originally posted 2012-05-27 20:04:52. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How to Sleep with Sleep Apnea

how to sleep with sleep apnea

Sleep hygiene tactics are very important if you want to get at least eight hours of healthy, replenishing sleep every night and ward off the risk of insomnia.

By being aware and learning to deal with common distortions, like how to sleep with sleep apnea, you can find way to get a good night’s sleep.

It’s a good idea to experiment. What works for some people to help them sleep might not work effectively for others. Knowing the best sleep technique that works for you is very critical to your well-being.

The first method to enhancing the quality of your sleep, especially if you are suffering from sleep apnea, is figuring out how much rest you need.

While requirements for sleep differ from one individual to another, a good number of healthy people require at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep every night to stay active and sharp.

One of the most crucial techniques for attaining a sound rest is to get back in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake rhythm.

If you maintain a regular rest schedule, hitting the bed and rising up at the same time each morning, you will feel more reinvigorated and recharged than if you sleep at different times on the same number of hours.

What is apnea sleep disorder?

Sleep apnea, which is one of the causes of insomniais a common sleep disorder that happens when a person’s breathing is distorted during sleep.

A person with untreated sleep apnea repeatedly experiences brief disruptions in breathing during sleep. The body and the brain may not get enough oxygen as a result of repeated distortions in normal breathing, which can be of concern, particularly if  it happens frequently during the night.

Sleep apnea affects millions of people all over the world, and is quite common and people will often go back to sleep without waking.

However, if it is disrupting your rest, here are three quick tips on how to sleep with sleep apnea:

1. Before sleeping, try doing an abdominal breathing exercise. Breathing from the abdomen helps to calm nerves and other organs in the body and makes you feel good.

2. Meditation has also been proven by those suffering from insomnia as an effective way to help people get a good night’s sleep.

3. Medical experts suggest a few minutes of quiet time to meditate before hitting the bed. Meditation not only helps calm the body, it also helps free the mind from unwanted clutter.

Originally posted 2012-06-01 13:52:25. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What is Sleepwalking?

Do you sleepwalk or know someone that does? If you do then you might have seen them appearing lifeless, like a zombie, shuffling around with their eyes closed and left wondering ‘what is sleep walking?’

It is quite difficult to understand how people are able to sleep while doing something else. But it is actually quite a common symptom of a sleep disorder.

Sleep-walking is one of the more common sleep disorders classified under parasomnias. It is characterized by complex body behaviour during slow-wave sleep and is most often evident during the first third of the night, or during other times of increased slow-wave activity.

Also known as somnambulism, the condition is more prevalent among children, and becomes less common as they become teenagers and then stops at reaching adulthood. Unfortunately, for some, the condition may last for most of their lifetime.

Sleep-walking is not limited to sleeping while walking. Some episodes include sitting up, fumbling, picking at bed clothes and mumbling. But usually sleepwalkers simply stand up and walk around quietly and aimlessly.

These episodes usually last for a couple of minutes and may occur three to four nights per week. After an episode of sleepwalking, the person is usually confused and remembers very little of what happened, if anything at all. Clearly, even they can’t understand how it’s possible to sleep while walking around.

What causes sleepwalking and can it be treated?

Research suggests that a variety of factors contribute to sleepwalking. These include genetic, developmental, organic and psychological factors. Furthermore, somnambulism can be triggered by fever, medication with some drugs, stress and major life events.

Considering that different factors contribute and trigger sleepwalking, it should not be dealt with alone. It’s recommended that someone suffering from sleepwalking should consult a doctor to discover whether there is an underlying cause. The doctor will not only help a sleepwalker identify the actual cause of the problem; they may also be able to give advice about improving sleep habits, having a good night’s sleep and how to stop sleepwalking.

Depending on the doctor’s assessment, the patient may also be recommended to seek additional advice from a psychologist or sleep specialist and discover how to sleep properly without sleep walking.

Originally posted 2012-06-21 19:07:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What is a Sleep Disorder?

a sleep disorder could be keeping you awake

On average we all need six to eight hours of sleep every night. Any less than this may effect you the next day, with symptoms like low energy, mood swings and concentration problems. However, from a medical perspective, these mere interferences may already be considered as signs and symptoms of a sleep disorder.

Sleep disorders are classified into:

1) insomnia

2) parasomnia or undesirable motor or autonomic activity during sleep

3) sleep disorders associated with medical disorders

4) proposed sleep disorders (e.g., pregnancy-related sleeping disorders.

They are affected by one’s amount and quality of sleep. Among them, the most common among children and adults is insomnia.

Insomnia is broadly defined as a condition where the person experiences inadequate or poor quality of sleep, difficulty in initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and sleep that is not restorative and/or refreshing.

It may be attributed to primary or secondary causes. The former refers to that which is unrelated to any unidentifiable medical or psychiatric disorder while the latter includes conditions where another disorder which contributes or aggravates the dilemma can be diagnosed.

A good example of a primary cause is adjustment disorder. One who experienced job loss, hospitalization and other stressful life events may encounter difficulty in sleeping. On the other hand, secondary causes include medical illnesses (e.g., respiratory disorders) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety).

Aside from its causes, insomnia may also be classified according to its severity. It may be mild, moderate or severe. As the degree of severity increases, the impairment to one’s social or occupational functioning increases (The International Classification, 2001).

Furthermore, the same classification may also refer to the frequency of one’s sleeplessness ‘episodes’. A person with a mild sleeping disorder encounters ‘episodes’ only for a few nights; whereas a person with a severe form of the condition encounters the same for more than a month.

Regardless of its cause or severity, a person must immediately consult a physician if he/she thinks he/she has insomnia. For one, it is considered as a medical condition; hence, it must be treated. Second, more than it being a medical condition, the condition may lead to devastating consequences.

What started out as lack of sleep may end with a person not living his/her full potential due to exhaustion, fatigue and even depression. Therefore, insomnia must be treated and not taken for granted.




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