Study Finds that Insomnia and Restless Leg Syndrome Pose Greater Risk for Women than Men

restless leg syndrome can stop you getting to sleep

A Sleep in America poll of all adults revealed that women have more difficulty falling and staying asleep than men. This also means that they experience more daytime sleepiness at least a few nights or days a week. Women take longer to fall asleep than men and pose a rather indistinctive symptoms than men. This is due to the biological and physiological characteristic present in women. Some contributing factors for why women sleep differently are believed to be sex chromosomes, hormonal and physical changes, estrogen influence on our body, and biological conditions like menstrual cycle, pregnancy and menopause. Pregnant women doubled the risk factor for RLS compared to women who have never given birth and men.

Nearly half of women struggle to get to sleep at night

Although women generally go to bed at a sensible time compared to men, 46% of women were complaining that they have trouble sleeping every night. This was according to several clinical studies gathered by Neurology Medlink and from several respected contributors. Aside from dealing with menstrual cycle, postpartum, menopause and pregnancy. Women are more resistant to high altitude periodic breathing than men and 10% of pregnant women are diagnosed with having restless leg syndrome. Another unaddressed problem is the diagnosis of sleep disorders in women. Sleep disorders in women are said to be under-recognized, misdiagnosed and mistreated. This should be communicated accurately without gender bias.

When women can’t sleep it can effect them in more ways than one

When a woman suffers from poor sleep quality compared to men, and is at higher risk for breast cancer, miscarriage and infertility, then the need to include these unique psychosocial issues into research should be prioritized. But how much sleep do we really need? These are the kind of questions I hear from my friends and family. What the research says though is that there is no magic number. But there’s no doubt that nobody wants to have their sleep disturbed by nervous leg disorder, man or woman.

How Can I Stop Snoring?

how to stop snoring

Does your snowing keep your partner awake? Snoring could be considered a sleep disorder, although it’s not you (the snorer) that suffers from insomnia because of it but your partner.

Snores are breath sounds that most people produce during sleep. Acoustically, snoring is attributed to the vibration of the anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. It is characterized by loud breathing in the upper airways without the absence of breath.

Like insomnia, snoring can be classified into mild, moderate or severe. Such classification is based on frequency, body position and disturbance for other people (i.e., spouse, sleeping partner).

As the degree of severity increases, the snorer has a greater risk of having an upper airway dysfunction which may lead to sleep apnea (the cessation of airflow to the lungs during sleep). Because of this, people with a snoring condition should try to find ways to relieve it or prevent it from happening.

Tactics to stop snoring

One of the most effective anti-snoring techniques is losing excess weight. The pressure of extra flesh on the airway makes night-time breathing difficult. In fact, researchers suggest that snoring is positively related to one’s Body Mass Index (BMI); meaning, as one’s BMI increases, a person is more likely to snore.

Another effective technique against snoring is to sleep on your side. This will prevent your tongue from falling back into the throat and blocking the airway.

Finally, you could try avoiding alcohol and sedating medications (i.e., painkillers) because they can relax your throat muscles too much and increase the likelihood of snoring (and sleep apnea).

Anti-snoring devices

You could also try anti-snoring devices. For instance, a chin strap keeps your mouth shut and forces you to breathe through your nose. If devices like this do not work, various surgeries are also possible that can permanently widen the airway.

So if your snoring is keeping your partner or other people in your house awake, then there are steps you can take to stop yourself snoring. Research suggests that one’s snoring condition may become a nuisance to others (e.g., insomnia can be attributed to a sleeping partner who snores). To avoid this, you should try the tactics to stop snoring suggested above or even consider surgery. After all, you will not only be helping yourself to sleep better but other people too.

Originally posted 2012-06-10 22:36:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

axbo SleepPhase and Sleeptracker Elite Review – Can technology help you sleep better?

axbo sleepphase alarm clock

Do you ever wake up in the morning and still feel exhausted, even after eight or more hours of sleep? If you’re like me, waking up feeling half asleep can make me feel grumpy and tired for the rest of the morning (if not the whole day). Why is this? And is there anything we can do about it?

Why you can still feel tired

Every night our bodies go through 3-5 sleep cycles lasting around 90 minutes. These sleep cycles fluctuate between deep sleep and a light slumber, as your body rejuvenates itself for the day ahead. If you wake up during a light sleep cycle then you can feel alert and refreshed. But waking up during a deep sleep can mean you wake up feeling tired because your mind still feels half in sleep mode, causing you to desperately hammer the snooze button on your alarm and wish you could sleep for a couple of hours more.

With a good night’s sleep vital to our mental and physical health, technology boffins have come up with a few inventions that help to track our sleep patterns and to help you sleep better at night.

axbo SleepPhase Sleep Monitor

This advanced alarm clock analyses your sleep patterns via a wireless wristband worn while you sleep. Developed by sleep scientists (whatever they are), the axbo SleepPhase sleep monitor will then wake you up gently,with the sound of birdsong or five other gentle sound, while you’re in a light sleep phase up to 30 minutes before your normal alarm clock. This enables you to wake up feeling more refreshed and energetic, rather than grumpy and tired.

If you fail to wake up then a conventional buzzer will sound to get you out of bed.

The axbo SleepPhase sleep monitor comes with two different wristbands, for you and your partner. It will also display your sleep patterns in an interesting graph, which might be nice to look at but confusing as to how it can help improve your sleep.

While not exactly cheap, if you place a premium on a good night’s sleep then the axbo SleepPhase is worth a look. It scores favorably in reviews, with many people feeling more awake and less drowsy from being woken during a light sleep cycle, rather than groggy and tired. It’s also smartly designed, which will appeal to those that value the design of gadgets almost as highly as the technology itself.

Sleeptracker Elite

This smart looking wristwatch was named the invention of the year by Time Magazine. Like the axbo SleepPhase, the Sleeptracker Elite monitors your sleep patterns and then aims to wake you at the optimal time. In particular, it monitors the number of sleep interruptions during the night to see whether it’s these that are causing you to feel exhausted in the morning, such as pets jumping on your bed in the middle of the night.

The Sleeptracker Elite scores highly in reviews, with lots of people confirming that its maker’s claims are right and that it works. However, wearing a watch all night might feel a bit clammy and uncomfortable for some, in which case you might want to opt for the axbo SleepPhases instead.

Fitbit One Wireless Activity and Sleep Tracker

This gadget is like a Swiss army knife for monitoring your daily health. Along with tracking your sleep patterns, the Fitbit One can record the number of steps you’ve walked and how many calories you’ve burned. After logging events in your daily routine, such as what you’ve eaten and your workouts, you can then share the results with friends and other users on the maker’s website to win badges and encourage one another’s progress.

In terms of helping you to sleep, the Fitbit One is slipped into a wristband at night to measure your sleep cycle and the number of times you wake up during the night to give you a sleep quality score. However, it wont wake you on its own accord without you setting the timer. So it cant be used to wake you up during a light sleep cycle like the other two devices. So the Fitbit One is only really worth considering if you want to use it to measure and record your daily health and lifestyle, rather than a sleep boosting device on its own.

Originally posted 2013-03-04 14:42:46. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What is a Sleep Disorder?

a sleep disorder could be keeping you awake

On average we all need six to eight hours of sleep every night. Any less than this may effect you the next day, with symptoms like low energy, mood swings and concentration problems. However, from a medical perspective, these mere interferences may already be considered as signs and symptoms of a sleep disorder.

Sleep disorders are classified into:

1) insomnia

2) parasomnia or undesirable motor or autonomic activity during sleep

3) sleep disorders associated with medical disorders

4) proposed sleep disorders (e.g., pregnancy-related sleeping disorders.

They are affected by one’s amount and quality of sleep. Among them, the most common among children and adults is insomnia.

Insomnia is broadly defined as a condition where the person experiences inadequate or poor quality of sleep, difficulty in initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and sleep that is not restorative and/or refreshing.

It may be attributed to primary or secondary causes. The former refers to that which is unrelated to any unidentifiable medical or psychiatric disorder while the latter includes conditions where another disorder which contributes or aggravates the dilemma can be diagnosed.

A good example of a primary cause is adjustment disorder. One who experienced job loss, hospitalization and other stressful life events may encounter difficulty in sleeping. On the other hand, secondary causes include medical illnesses (e.g., respiratory disorders) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety).

Aside from its causes, insomnia may also be classified according to its severity. It may be mild, moderate or severe. As the degree of severity increases, the impairment to one’s social or occupational functioning increases (The International Classification, 2001).

Furthermore, the same classification may also refer to the frequency of one’s sleeplessness ‘episodes’. A person with a mild sleeping disorder encounters ‘episodes’ only for a few nights; whereas a person with a severe form of the condition encounters the same for more than a month.

Regardless of its cause or severity, a person must immediately consult a physician if he/she thinks he/she has insomnia. For one, it is considered as a medical condition; hence, it must be treated. Second, more than it being a medical condition, the condition may lead to devastating consequences.

What started out as lack of sleep may end with a person not living his/her full potential due to exhaustion, fatigue and even depression. Therefore, insomnia must be treated and not taken for granted.




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