New Study Scraps Insomnia’s Link to Hypertension

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According to new findings, led by Dr. Nicholas Vozoris, a respirologist at St. Michael’s hospital in Toronto, insomnia does not raise the risk of hypertension. This is contrary to research published a while ago, which found that people with insomnia have higher level of stress hormones in their blood stream that would most likely elevate blood pressure. However, Dr. Vozoris pointed out that those previous studies have gathered inconsistent results. Vozoris said, “The fact that even people with more severe insomnia didn’t show a link, that finding provides impressive proof that there’s probably no real link between the two items,”

Even though, we can be at ease with these new findings, the fact remains that Insomnia can lead to several health concerns. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention stated that more than one-quarter of the U.S. population were suffering from wakefulness disorder and 10% of American adults are experiencing chronic insomnia and the numbers are increasing every day.

Obesity, Diabetes, Anxiety and Depression are just some of the health effects of sleep loss. A person who misses a night of sleep can be expected to be exhausted the next day, reduce attention span and possible problems with short-term memory. Severe wakefulness can cause poor coordination, muscle twitching, nausea and loss of concentration as well. The various effects of sleep deprivation have yet to be fully uncovered. There are so many research and studies yet to be done to prove the hypothesis. But one thing is for sure, sleep deprivation and insomnia can pose a threat to anyone.

A healthy lifestyle and setting a regular bedtime is a key to get in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake cycle. Try sleeping in a quieter room and settle yourself in a dark and comfortable environment. If you set a regular bedtime, then you should also set the same wake up time every day. Taking a nap on the afternoon is not a good idea, if you are following a strict bedtime rule.

Sleep Hygiene Tips to Help Cure John Noble’s Sleep Disorder

It’s been reported in the news today that filming of the sci-fi show ‘Fringe’ has been brought to a halt due to one of its star actors, John Noble, suffering from a reported sleep disorder. Reports claim that his lack of sleep has been affecting his performance, and consequently filming has been halted for nine days while he gets medical treatment.

This highlights how damaging insomnia can be to your daily life. It makes you feel tired, irritable and unable to concentrate. This can obviously have negative effects on your ability to perform in your daily job, whether you’re a teacher, builder or if you sit at a desk all day.

Sleep disorders and insomnia can be caused by a variety of mental and medical triggers. So one of the first steps to curing insomnia is to identify the underlying cause, whether it’s feeling anxious about a problem (like money) or a medical condition that needs treatment, such as heartburn.

Although the temptation might be to immediately prescribe Noble with medication to help him sleep, here are some sleep hygiene tips he can try to try and get more hours of healthy, rejuvenating sleep naturally:

1) Avoid caffeine or alcohol late at night – Caffeine will simply keep you awake while alcohol might help you sleep initially but you wont reach the deep sleep your body needs to rejuvenate.

2) Don’t watch TV, play video games or sit working on a laptop in bed – these activities will hamper your subconscious link between your bed and sleep. Beds should be just for sleep…and something else that can help cure insomnia.

3) Avoid strenuous exercise a few hours before you go to bed – your body’s activity levels aren’t like a switch that can simply be turned off when it’s time to get some shuteye. Instead, you need to start slowing down gradually

4) Have a regular sleeping routine – this might be difficult for Noble to achieve with a fluctuating film schedule to contend with, but you will find it easier to go to sleep if you have a regular routine. Try and go to bed at the same time every night, and get up at the same time (of course, late nights and late rises are allowed on weekends).

5) Avoid napping during the day – while political leaders and high powered business men like to boast of their ability to keep rolling with only a few hours sleep and a power nap in the afternoon. The problem with napping during the day is it knocks you out of your regular sleeping pattern and can leave you feeling wide awake until late into the night.

6) Try natural remedies – chamonille tea, milk and bananas are just three natural cures for insomnia that can help your mind and body to relax and to calm you down ready for 7 hours or more of peaceful slumber.

The first response to curing Noble’s insomnia might be to prescribe him sleeping tablets, which can be effective but can be addictive and can make you feel drowsy the next day. So it would be more sensible (and healthier) if Noble follows these simple sleep hygiene techniques so that he can be back on set and able to deliver fans of ‘Fringe’ the series ending they’ve been looking forward to all these years.

Do’s and Don’ts before bedtime

Help me sleep tip - dont drink coffee late at night

If you are still widely awake at past your bed time. You might be thinking of ways on how to get yourself fall asleep. Maybe you have a lot of things in your mind that’s keeping you awake. It is said that a hormone called “melatonin” is the one responsible to help you sleep. To be able to induce more melatonin into our system we need to relax our mind and body. The 2 effective ways that I know of is Deep Breathing exercise and changing those troubling thoughts with happy and positive ones. But if these doesn’t help you sleep yet, don’t be tempted to open your computer, smart phones and television. Because these electronic gadgets emits blue light that can hinder the production of melatonin in your body.

I have insomnia for years now and it has been so hard to undo everything and re-program my sleeping pattern back to its normal routine. I hate waking up the next morning feeling tired because of lack of sleep. What I did was I did not sleep for 36 hours, I fought the urge of taking naps on day time. I would either pinch myself or play some video games just to avoid sleeping. At 6 pm the following day I was really tired and exhausted that after taking a long bath I slammed my body on my bed and took the longest sleep I’ve ever had in my life!

The day after that, I feel like I was rejuvenated. I don’t feel weak anymore.  My mind was functioning really well. Now, I am still trying to sleep on my bed time.  Although, there are times that I could not help but break my bedtime rules every once in a while because I had to do some overtime work. I just read my favorite book and within minutes I’m already snoring. I don’t know if this is the same with everyone else but if you intend to sleep early and you like to doze off by reading something. Go for the hardcopy and avoid wattpad.

The Health Benefits of a Good Night’s Sleep

a good night's sleep helps you feel healthier and more energetic

Overcoming your insomnia is already a feat in itself. But being able to do so will not only give you more hours of restful sleep, it can also lead to great health benefits. Many people don’t realize that not knowing how to get enough sleep can contribute to some serious health problems. Conversely, getting your daily dose of good night’s sleep can bring about surprising results.

So if you’re always wondering how to sleep better, act fast. Discover the different types of remedies and medical treatments that can help you. Learn relaxation techniques that can boost your chances of sleeping well, and gain all the health benefits that come with restorative sleep.

  1. Better immune system – When you sleep, your body works overtime to repair cells, tissues, and muscles. Knowing how to sleepwell keeps your immunity system strong, protecting you from viruses like flu and colds.
  2. More energy – When you are not tired and drowsy, you will have more energy to take on the day’s activities. When you get enough sleep you will feel more refreshed and invigorated.
  3. Healthier heart – Sleeping well contributes to your overall health and reduces the possibility of developing health problems such as heart disease. Like any other body organ, the heart is made up of muscles that need to be constantly maintained and repaired.
  4. Improved memory – While you are sleeping, the brain strengthens your memory and stores away all the information you learned during the day. When you’re trying to learn a new skill, you have greater chances of remembering the new things you learned after a good night’s sleep.
  5. Healthy weight – When you don’t get enough sleep, certain hormones in your brain are created and these can trigger you to feel hungry more often. This can lead to unnecessary weight gain.

With so many benefits, it’s no wonder insomnia and a lack of sleep can make you feel rundown. So take advantage of all the useful advice on this website on how to get to sleep for more hours every night.

What is a Sleep Disorder?

a sleep disorder could be keeping you awake

On average we all need six to eight hours of sleep every night. Any less than this may effect you the next day, with symptoms like low energy, mood swings and concentration problems. However, from a medical perspective, these mere interferences may already be considered as signs and symptoms of a sleep disorder.

Sleep disorders are classified into:

1) insomnia

2) parasomnia or undesirable motor or autonomic activity during sleep

3) sleep disorders associated with medical disorders

4) proposed sleep disorders (e.g., pregnancy-related sleeping disorders.

They are affected by one’s amount and quality of sleep. Among them, the most common among children and adults is insomnia.

Insomnia is broadly defined as a condition where the person experiences inadequate or poor quality of sleep, difficulty in initiating and/or maintaining sleep, and sleep that is not restorative and/or refreshing.

It may be attributed to primary or secondary causes. The former refers to that which is unrelated to any unidentifiable medical or psychiatric disorder while the latter includes conditions where another disorder which contributes or aggravates the dilemma can be diagnosed.

A good example of a primary cause is adjustment disorder. One who experienced job loss, hospitalization and other stressful life events may encounter difficulty in sleeping. On the other hand, secondary causes include medical illnesses (e.g., respiratory disorders) and psychiatric disorders (e.g., anxiety).

Aside from its causes, insomnia may also be classified according to its severity. It may be mild, moderate or severe. As the degree of severity increases, the impairment to one’s social or occupational functioning increases (The International Classification, 2001).

Furthermore, the same classification may also refer to the frequency of one’s sleeplessness ‘episodes’. A person with a mild sleeping disorder encounters ‘episodes’ only for a few nights; whereas a person with a severe form of the condition encounters the same for more than a month.

Regardless of its cause or severity, a person must immediately consult a physician if he/she thinks he/she has insomnia. For one, it is considered as a medical condition; hence, it must be treated. Second, more than it being a medical condition, the condition may lead to devastating consequences.

What started out as lack of sleep may end with a person not living his/her full potential due to exhaustion, fatigue and even depression. Therefore, insomnia must be treated and not taken for granted.