Study finds jogging can help you sleep better

jogging can help me get to sleep

A recent study has found that jogging can help you sleep at night.

Insomnia is often caused by troubling thoughts. Worrying is one of the main reasons people have trouble sleeping. So it makes sense that going for a jog in the local park or forest can be beneficial to release the tension.

Doctors tend to agree according to a Glasgow University study. In a survey of 2000 active people, it found that jogging outdoors was twice as beneficial as exercising in a gym. You can read more about the study in this Daily Telegraph article.

The study concluded that being around nature heightens our sense of well being more than being indoors. In addition, the researchers found that exercising outdoors lifts mood and relieves stress. Both of these can be highly beneficial if you are suffering from insomnia and wondering ‘how can I get to sleep?’ at night.

So if counting sheep isn’t working, maybe you should put on your trainers and pound the earth in your local park for 30 minutes to see if jogging can helps you sleep instead.

Originally posted 2012-06-20 16:32:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Help Me Sleep! What Causes Insomnia?

Insomnia and wondering how to get to sleep at night blights the lives of millions. If you aren’t getting  the recommended eight hours of sleep a night then you can feel lethargic, irritable and unable to perform at your best. Prolonged sleep deprivation can also be very damaging to your health, as your body hasn’t had time to rejuvenate.

Thankfully, wondering how to get to sleep need not be a long-term problem. Through taking the right steps to improve your ‘sleep hygiene’ and making healthy lifestyle changes, you can find ways to help you to get to sleep at night and enjoy more lucid dreams.

Why does insomnia occur?

There are a wide range of reasons why you might be thinking of visiting your doctor and asking them to ‘help me sleep.’ In fact, a reaction to medication could be the root cause, so it’s a good idea to check whether your insomnia started at a particular time.

More common reasons for insomnia are psychological, notably stress, anxiety and/or depression. There can prevent your mind from reaching the relaxed state you need to be able to drift off to sleep. So if you think your sleep deprivation might be due to a mental cause then the best advice is to try and resolve the issue that is making you anxious. Although this may be easier said than done, it’s far healthier than reaching for the sleeping pills.

Other causes of that can stop you from sleeping can include taking stimulants, such as tobacco, alcohol or caffeine, a couple of hours before you want to get some shut eye and descend into lucid dreaming. These put your mind into a heightened state of alertness which makes it difficult to firstly get to sleep and secondly to reach the level of deep sleep needed so your mind and body can rejuvenate itself during the night.

Sleep Hygiene Tips

Sleep hygiene is the process of creating the right conditions and patterns of behaviour for making how to get to sleep easier. Along with cutting out stimulants from your diet, good sleep hygiene tactics on how to go to sleep include going to bed at the same time every night, not watching TV in bed and not eating a large meal too late at night.

While sleeping pills can help for brief periods of insomnia, they can be addictive as you can start to think that the only way to sleep is to pop a few pills every night. Sleeping pills can also make you drowsy the next day, which can be dangerous if you work in a hazardous environment, such as a building site.

An alternative is to try natural remedies. This includes a warm glass of milk, bananas and camomile tea, which releases relaxing chemicals in the brain that can help you drift off to the land of nod.

So if you find yourself lying awake at night thinking ‘what can help me sleep’, try some of the tips in this article so you can stop counting sheep and spend more time enjoying lucid dreams catching zzzs.

Originally posted 2012-10-18 14:34:21. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Are There Psychological Changes that Can Help Me Sleep Better?

is anxiety stopping you from sleepingAnother night spent tossing and turning in bed? Before you start losing hope, know that you are not alone. You might not know it, but every night there are plenty of other people begging the universe to ‘help me sleep!’

The key to dealing with your insomnia problem is identifying the cause. There are many possible reasons why sleep evades you night after night.

Sleep experts say that among the most common causes of insomnia are psychological conditions. This can mean anything from stress to depression and anxiety. In fact, most temporary insomnia attacks are tied to specific triggers such as stressing over major exams, suffering jet lag, or recovering from a painful breakup. Often, once you are able to overcome these situations, your sleeping pattern goes back to normal and you’re no longer constantly wondering ‘what can I do to help me sleep!’

How to sleep better by facing the mental causes

However, if you are suffering from chronic or recurrent insomnia, it’s possible that your sleeplessness is a symptom of a particular mental or physical issue. As mentioned, it can be caused by stress, depression, or anxiety. It may also be the result of bipolar disorder or a traumatic experience.

Instead of fretting over what you can do to help me sleep, ask yourself questions to help you determine if there are monsters in your mind that you need to battle. Are you stressed or depressed? Do you often worry about everything? Is there a recent event that triggered the insomnia attack?

As the saying goes, sometimes it’s all in the mind. Recognizing signs of a psychological issue can help you make the appropriate lifestyle changes so you can stop the nightly battle with sleeplessness. It will also help you decide if it’s time to visit your doctor. Finding out what’s causing your insomnia is the first step to knowing how to sleep better.

Originally posted 2012-04-30 12:33:40. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Will Sleeping Pills Help Me Sleep?

medical treatments for insomnia

medical treatments for insomnia

In today’s fast paced world we’re always looking for a quick fix. Got a headache? You can get a pill for that. Need some energy? Knock back an energy drink. The same is true for when you’re wondering how to get to sleep.

Reaching for sleeping pills is the first resort for many. In fact, an article in The Guardian on Britain’s hidden addiction to sleeping pills has highlighted some shocking statistics. Ten percent of people now take medication for insomnia, which amounts to 15.3 million prescriptions every year costing the NHS £50 million per year in sleeping pills. What’s worse is that there has been a ten percent rise in people asking their doctor to ‘help me sleep’ and then knocking back some tablets.

The sharp rise over the last four years coincides with when the recession hits, and suggests that stress and money worries could be the psychological triggers behind people’s insomnia. But is medication the best way forward?

Addressing anxious thoughts can help sooth the soul and help the brain drift to sleep

While beneficial for people with chronic insomnia, a genetic condition or struggling through a brief period (such as a bereavement), sleeping pills can have some worrying side effects. People can form a dependency, believing they can’t sleep without them, they can have more accidents from feeling drowsy the next day and they certainly arent cheap.

It’s been suggested by a leading sleep specialist – Kevin Morgan, professor of gerontology at the University of Loughborough – that cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) might be a more practical solution for many people suffering from insomnia and wondering how to get to sleep at night. CBT is a form of psychotherapy that teaches people to challenge the irrational and negative thought processes that are causing problems in their life, and is a highly effective method of treating mental disorders, such as anxiety and depression.

With many people’s insomnia caused by anxiety or stress it makes sense that teaching people to address the underlying problems or thoughts causing their insomnia can be a more practical approach than simply popping a pill to paper over the cracks. The Department of Health in the UK is due to assign £400 million over the next four years to this type of talking theory, so it’s clear that the benefits are real and proven.

Combined with sleep hygiene practices

As always, the first step in tackling insomnia is to assess whether your habits are getting in the way of getting a good night’s sleep. This means adopting sleep hygiene practices to eliminate all the stimuli that could be keeping you awake at night wondering ‘how can I get to sleep?’

This includes avoiding stimulants, such as caffeine and alcohol, before you go to bed. While alcohol can help you fall asleep in can prevent you reaching a deep rejuvenating level you need for your body to rest and recuperate. Other habits to avoid are watching TV or sitting in bed working on your laptop late at night.

To help put your mind in a relaxed mood, there are also natural remedies you can try, such as chamomile tea, bananas or a warm glass of milk to help you drift off to the land of nod without the use of medication.

Originally posted 2012-08-21 14:35:45. Republished by Blog Post Promoter




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