Study Finds that Not Coping with Stress One of Main Causes of Insomnia

stress and insomnia

Stress has been considered as one of the most common emotional issues that causes Insomnia. A recent study by the American Academy of Sleep Medicine investigated the factors that can affect our sleeping patterns. According to the study, it is not the stress that you experienced throughout the day that keeps you awake It is the way you cope with the stress and how you respond to your stressor.

The study sampled a community of 2,892 people with no history of insomnia. The participants were asked to report a number of stressful events that they encounter and their coping mechanisms with the corresponding stressful events.
The three coping mechanisms that were identified that are most likely to develop insomnia after a stressful event are:

  • Alcohol
  • Watching TV
  • Denial

According to the American Psychological Association’s Stress in America, they surveyed that almost 13 percent of Americans have turned to alcohol to ease down their stress level. But alcohol can cause sleep disturbance later at night, leaving you more exhausted and weak the next morning.

Those who opted to just watch TV or movies have a 4 percent risk of insomnia. They may forget their stressor momentarily while enjoying some entertainment, but the fact remains that their stressor is still unresolved and at the end of the day they have to come face to face with their problems.

The people who are in Denial and chose not to cope with their stress have the highest percentage of risk to develop insomnia, with a 9 percent increased of risk to develop insomnia for every sign of resignation.

Relieve stress to reduce insomnia

Thankfully, there are certain stress reliever strategies that can help you drift off at night. Dr. Vivek Pillai of the Research Center at Henry Ford Hospital suggested that mindfulness based meditation and cognitive behavioral therapy for insomnia are two of the most effective methods that can treat insomnia.

I personally treat my chronic insomnia with breathing exercise and some cardio during the morning. A long steam shower an hour before my bedtime can also make a difference.

Originally posted 2014-07-22 12:14:35. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

3 Steps to Changing Unhelpful Thoughts if You Can’t Sleep at Night

stop anxiety if cant sleep

If you’ve had a stressful day it can be difficult to shut off and forget about it when you get home. Your mind can keep running over what happened and stop you from being able to feel relaxed at bedtime. If you’ve had a long soak in the bath, maybe even meditated and had a nice warm glass of milk and still can’t sleep then you need to address the negative thoughts and emotions keeping you awake at night.

Try following these 3 simple steps to address anxiety levels and increase your amount of sleep:

1. Accept the unchangeable

If it’s something that happened in your past that’s troubling you then you need to let it go. If you are blaming others for your mistakes then acceptance can become a hard process to accomplish. Stop lamenting on your missed opportunities and accept the fact that it already slipped through your hands. You can’t change what happened in the past, it is better to focus on what you can change at the moment. Learn from your past mistakes and do not commit the same mistakes again.

Learn to forgive and forget. You can’t move on and start a new beginning if you are still trap on your wrath. It is always better to live life away from hatred and grudges. Success is the best form of revenge. Focus on being successful and live in the moment. That way you can be truly happy.

2. Change the changeable

Think of the things that are changeable in your life, yourself and your environment. The most important change you should make is to change how you react on anything thrown at you. It is your choice to react positively or negatively you can control your thoughts to draw a positive result.

It is best to react not on emotional impulse but rather on logical and rational actions. Keep in mind that if you react negatively you will get the same negative feedback. Try to wait a few moments before you react and give your reasons a chance to compete with your emotions.

3. Avoid the unacceptable

Walk away from people who are bad company. Use your judgment well, if someone in dubious character approaches you take a left or a right. If someone is trying to annoy you learn to ignore. If someone is trying to test your patience learn to laugh it out and stay your cool.

Maintaining an alert mind especially on negative situations that can endanger your personal safety, health, financial ventures and relationships is just one way of keeping yourself away from stress.

Life is always going to be stressful at times. However, thinking in a calm, relaxed way about yourself and the world around you can help to keep stress levels low and positivity high. Stress and anxiety is one of the main causes of insomnia, so if you can’t sleep try to address what is causing this stress and anxiety to help yourself to feel calmer, happier and more able to switch off and doze off at bedtime.

Study Finds that Insomnia and Restless Leg Syndrome Pose Greater Risk for Women than Men

restless leg syndrome can stop you getting to sleep

A Sleep in America poll of all adults revealed that women have more difficulty falling and staying asleep than men. This also means that they experience more daytime sleepiness at least a few nights or days a week. Women take longer to fall asleep than men and pose a rather indistinctive symptoms than men. This is due to the biological and physiological characteristic present in women. Some contributing factors for why women sleep differently are believed to be sex chromosomes, hormonal and physical changes, estrogen influence on our body, and biological conditions like menstrual cycle, pregnancy and menopause. Pregnant women doubled the risk factor for RLS compared to women who have never given birth and men.

Nearly half of women struggle to get to sleep at night

Although women generally go to bed at a sensible time compared to men, 46% of women were complaining that they have trouble sleeping every night. This was according to several clinical studies gathered by Neurology Medlink and from several respected contributors. Aside from dealing with menstrual cycle, postpartum, menopause and pregnancy. Women are more resistant to high altitude periodic breathing than men and 10% of pregnant women are diagnosed with having restless leg syndrome. Another unaddressed problem is the diagnosis of sleep disorders in women. Sleep disorders in women are said to be under-recognized, misdiagnosed and mistreated. This should be communicated accurately without gender bias.

When women can’t sleep it can effect them in more ways than one

When a woman suffers from poor sleep quality compared to men, and is at higher risk for breast cancer, miscarriage and infertility, then the need to include these unique psychosocial issues into research should be prioritized. But how much sleep do we really need? These are the kind of questions I hear from my friends and family. What the research says though is that there is no magic number. But there’s no doubt that nobody wants to have their sleep disturbed by nervous leg disorder, man or woman.