What is Sleepwalking?

Do you sleepwalk or know someone that does? If you do then you might have seen them appearing lifeless, like a zombie, shuffling around with their eyes closed and left wondering ‘what is sleep walking?’

It is quite difficult to understand how people are able to sleep while doing something else. But it is actually quite a common symptom of a sleep disorder.

Sleep-walking is one of the more common sleep disorders classified under parasomnias. It is characterized by complex body behaviour during slow-wave sleep and is most often evident during the first third of the night, or during other times of increased slow-wave activity.

Also known as somnambulism, the condition is more prevalent among children, and becomes less common as they become teenagers and then stops at reaching adulthood. Unfortunately, for some, the condition may last for most of their lifetime.

Sleep-walking is not limited to sleeping while walking. Some episodes include sitting up, fumbling, picking at bed clothes and mumbling. But usually sleepwalkers simply stand up and walk around quietly and aimlessly.

These episodes usually last for a couple of minutes and may occur three to four nights per week. After an episode of sleepwalking, the person is usually confused and remembers very little of what happened, if anything at all. Clearly, even they can’t understand how it’s possible to sleep while walking around.

What causes sleepwalking and can it be treated?

Research suggests that a variety of factors contribute to sleepwalking. These include genetic, developmental, organic and psychological factors. Furthermore, somnambulism can be triggered by fever, medication with some drugs, stress and major life events.

Considering that different factors contribute and trigger sleepwalking, it should not be dealt with alone. It’s recommended that someone suffering from sleepwalking should consult a doctor to discover whether there is an underlying cause. The doctor will not only help a sleepwalker identify the actual cause of the problem; they may also be able to give advice about improving sleep habits, having a good night’s sleep and how to stop sleepwalking.

Depending on the doctor’s assessment, the patient may also be recommended to seek additional advice from a psychologist or sleep specialist and discover how to sleep properly without sleep walking.

Originally posted 2012-06-21 19:07:36. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How Can I Stop Snoring?

how to stop snoring

Does your snowing keep your partner awake? Snoring could be considered a sleep disorder, although it’s not you (the snorer) that suffers from insomnia because of it but your partner.

Snores are breath sounds that most people produce during sleep. Acoustically, snoring is attributed to the vibration of the anatomical structures in the pharyngeal airway. It is characterized by loud breathing in the upper airways without the absence of breath.

Like insomnia, snoring can be classified into mild, moderate or severe. Such classification is based on frequency, body position and disturbance for other people (i.e., spouse, sleeping partner).

As the degree of severity increases, the snorer has a greater risk of having an upper airway dysfunction which may lead to sleep apnea (the cessation of airflow to the lungs during sleep). Because of this, people with a snoring condition should try to find ways to relieve it or prevent it from happening.

Tactics to stop snoring

One of the most effective anti-snoring techniques is losing excess weight. The pressure of extra flesh on the airway makes night-time breathing difficult. In fact, researchers suggest that snoring is positively related to one’s Body Mass Index (BMI); meaning, as one’s BMI increases, a person is more likely to snore.

Another effective technique against snoring is to sleep on your side. This will prevent your tongue from falling back into the throat and blocking the airway.

Finally, you could try avoiding alcohol and sedating medications (i.e., painkillers) because they can relax your throat muscles too much and increase the likelihood of snoring (and sleep apnea).

Anti-snoring devices

You could also try anti-snoring devices. For instance, a chin strap keeps your mouth shut and forces you to breathe through your nose. If devices like this do not work, various surgeries are also possible that can permanently widen the airway.

So if your snoring is keeping your partner or other people in your house awake, then there are steps you can take to stop yourself snoring. Research suggests that one’s snoring condition may become a nuisance to others (e.g., insomnia can be attributed to a sleeping partner who snores). To avoid this, you should try the tactics to stop snoring suggested above or even consider surgery. After all, you will not only be helping yourself to sleep better but other people too.

Originally posted 2012-06-10 22:36:14. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Help Me Sleep! – Which Medical Remedies Can Help Me Get to Sleep?

medical treatments for insomnia

If you’ve tried just about every trick in the book on how to get to sleep and nothing has worked, then a trip to your doctor’s office might be in order. You might not be too fond of the idea, but you need to remember that when left untreated, insomnia lead to serious health risks.

It’s important to see your doctor because insomnia can be a symptom of some other medical problem such as a psychiatric condition like depression or a sleep disorder like restless legs syndrome. Home remedies and lifestyle changes are great, but when the problem persists, it’s time to consult the experts.

So go see your doctor and tell him, “Please help me sleep.”  Your doctor can offer a variety of treatments to cure your sleeplessness and these are just some of them:

Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (CBT) – Considered as an effective and lasting treatment to insomnia, CBT involves sessions with a trained professional who can help you deal with your stress or anxiety. The therapy aims to help you control the negative thoughts that keep you awake so you can sleep better.

Dietary supplements – There are countless products that claim to help you sleep. But two of the most popular options are Melatonin and Valerian. Melatonin is a natural hormone produced by the body at night, so taking supplements of this hormone may work for some people. Meanwhile, Valerian is an herb known for its mild sedative effects, which help some patients sleep better.

Prescription sleeping pills – On certain instances, your doctor might recommend prescription sleeping pills to help you solve your problem of how to sleep. While these are effective to some extent, it is important to know that they can be addicting and could lead to negative side effects such as high blood pressure or short-term memory loss.

Originally posted 2012-05-14 12:08:58. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How to Get to Sleep Naturally in 7 Simple Steps

From watching this video you will discover:

  • How to get to sleep naturally in 7 simple steps
  • 7 HORRIBLE things that can happen to your body if you don’t get enough sleep
  • Why modern lifestyles are making insomnia worse
  • Why not getting enough sleep could be aging your brain by 5 years
  • What is ‘sleep shampoo’ and how to release it in your brain
  • The recently discovered system that cleans our brain of waste products and toxins when we sleep
  • Why smartphones could be to blame for rocketing rates of insomnia
  • What are ‘anticholinergics’ and why you should avoid them as much as possible
  • The worrying link between ‘brain plaque’ and dementia
  • Why taking sleeping pills may be causing damage to your brain
  • The REAL reason more people are suffering from insomnia, and it is NOT due to stress or anxiety
  • 3 natural sleep aids taken for 1,000s of years to get more healthy, rejuvenating sleep
  • BONUS Tip – how to increase your body’s natural sleep hormone, which is vital for getting to sleep and staying asleep for longer

>>Find out more information on a Dr endorsed natural supplement that reduces anxiety, lifts mood and helps you to sleep better at night without prescription drugs and has a 92.7% positive rating after 2 years of study

Links to studies:

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm6008a2.ht
http://uk.businessinsider.com/what-happens-if-you-dont-get-enough-sleep-2017-3
https://sleepfoundation.org/media-center/press-release/quotes-the-2009-sleep-america-poll%E2%84%A2
http://www.telegraph.co.uk/women/health/bad-nights-sleep-really-does-body/
http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=98674086
http://www.health.com/health/gallery/0,,20459221_10,00.html
http://www.health.com/sleep/sleep-pill-guidelines
http://www.webmd.com/sleep-disorders/guide/understanding-the-side-effects-of-sleeping-pills#2
http://www.huffingtonpost.com/katie-letourneau/melatonin-when-did-natura_b_14664742.html

Originally posted 2017-05-15 12:22:12. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Help Me Sleep! The Physical and Medical Causes of Insomnia

Help me sleep tip - dont drink coffee late at night
Coffee is great in the morning. But not last thing at night!

Folks who fall asleep the moment their heads hit the bed probably don’t realize just how lucky they are. Unlike you, they don’t mumble “somebody help me sleep” over and over in frustration as they lie awake in bed. So what’s causing your sleepless nights? There are a number of possible reasons.

You need to know that, while insomnia is a disorder on its own, it can also be a symptom of other underlying problems. These issues could either be psychological or physical in nature. Physical conditions include health problems like heartburn and hormonal imbalance. Insomnia may also be a side effect of certain medicines, particularly those for asthma, allergies, and heart problems.

So the next time you find yourself counting sheep at 3 a.m. think about the possible causes for your insomnia attack. If you’ve been suffering from acid reflux or you’ve been taking asthma medication, plan a trip to the doctor. Your physician might be able to recommend tips on how to sleep better.

An alcoholic night cap isn’t going to help you sleep healthily

If you are sure that you’re healthy, look into your daily habits. Do you drink coffee late in the afternoon or after dinner? Do you smoke or drink alcohol regularly? These habits could be causing you to wail ‘help me sleep!’ every night. Caffeine and nicotine are both stimulants that keep you awake. Meanwhile, alcohol may be a sedative that can help you sleep, but it prevents deeper stages of sleep so you end up not feeling rested in the morning.

A simple elimination process can help you get to the bottom of your insomnia problem. By knowing the possible causes for your sleeplessness and paying more attention to your body, you will eventually be able to find the answer to the million dollar question: “What can help me sleep?”

Originally posted 2012-05-02 14:09:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Study finds jogging can help you sleep better

jogging can help me get to sleep

A recent study has found that jogging can help you sleep at night.

Insomnia is often caused by troubling thoughts. Worrying is one of the main reasons people have trouble sleeping. So it makes sense that going for a jog in the local park or forest can be beneficial to release the tension.

Doctors tend to agree according to a Glasgow University study. In a survey of 2000 active people, it found that jogging outdoors was twice as beneficial as exercising in a gym. You can read more about the study in this Daily Telegraph article.

The study concluded that being around nature heightens our sense of well being more than being indoors. In addition, the researchers found that exercising outdoors lifts mood and relieves stress. Both of these can be highly beneficial if you are suffering from insomnia and wondering ‘how can I get to sleep?’ at night.

So if counting sheep isn’t working, maybe you should put on your trainers and pound the earth in your local park for 30 minutes to see if jogging can helps you sleep instead.

Originally posted 2012-06-20 16:32:32. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

What is Apnea Sleep Disorder?

What is apnea sleep disorder

SLEEP apnea is a common disorder in which you experience one or more pauses or reductions in breathing or shallow breaths during sleep. These breathing pauses usually last between 8 to 15 seconds, sometimes longer, and can happen more than a hundred times while you are sleeping. Health experts blame the disorder as the main culprit for insomnia.

In most instances, normal breathing resumes, sometimes in a choking sound or loud snort. When regular breathing is temporarily interrupted, you are derailed off your natural sleep tracks. As a result, you spend more hours in faint sleep and very little moment in restorative sleep that people need to be mentally alert and physically active the following day.

The disorder, if left untreated, keeps you from enjoying a healthy night’s sleep which is very important in your overall mental and physical well-being. Chronic deprivation of sleep results in poor concentration, sluggishness, slow reflex, heightened risk of accidents, and daytime drowsiness.

Sleep apnea can also cause health problems over a certain period of time, including weight gain, insomnia, stroke, heart disease, hypertension and even diabetes.  But with early medical intervention, the symptoms can be controlled and allow you to get long normal sleeps and start to relish what it is like to feel reinvigorated and sharp every day.

Sleep apnea is normally a chronic malady that muddles your state of slumber. A person with the condition is often jolted out of deep sleep and into light sleep when their regular breathing pattern is disrupted or becomes superficial. The outcome is miserable sleep quality that makes the person feeling very feeble during his waking hours.

This form of sleep disturbance usually goes undiagnosed. Medical experts often can not detect the ailment during regular office visits. Also, sleep apnea does not require any blood testing.

Sleep apnea is very rare among children but common among grownups. Although a diagnosis of the disorder is often based on a person’s medical background, there are various types of tests that can be applied to validate the diagnosis. Treatment can be either non-surgical or surgical.

Majority of those who suffer from insomnia brought about by sleep apnea do not realize that they already have it simply because the disruption only takes place when they are sleeping. A member of the family or partner in bed is usually the first person who notices the symptoms of sleep apnea.

Originally posted 2012-05-27 20:04:52. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

How to Sleep with Sleep Apnea

how to sleep with sleep apnea

Sleep hygiene tactics are very important if you want to get at least eight hours of healthy, replenishing sleep every night and ward off the risk of insomnia.

By being aware and learning to deal with common distortions, like how to sleep with sleep apnea, you can find way to get a good night’s sleep.

It’s a good idea to experiment. What works for some people to help them sleep might not work effectively for others. Knowing the best sleep technique that works for you is very critical to your well-being.

The first method to enhancing the quality of your sleep, especially if you are suffering from sleep apnea, is figuring out how much rest you need.

While requirements for sleep differ from one individual to another, a good number of healthy people require at least 7 to 9 hours of sleep every night to stay active and sharp.

One of the most crucial techniques for attaining a sound rest is to get back in sync with your body’s natural sleep-wake rhythm.

If you maintain a regular rest schedule, hitting the bed and rising up at the same time each morning, you will feel more reinvigorated and recharged than if you sleep at different times on the same number of hours.

What is apnea sleep disorder?

Sleep apnea, which is one of the causes of insomniais a common sleep disorder that happens when a person’s breathing is distorted during sleep.

A person with untreated sleep apnea repeatedly experiences brief disruptions in breathing during sleep. The body and the brain may not get enough oxygen as a result of repeated distortions in normal breathing, which can be of concern, particularly if  it happens frequently during the night.

Sleep apnea affects millions of people all over the world, and is quite common and people will often go back to sleep without waking.

However, if it is disrupting your rest, here are three quick tips on how to sleep with sleep apnea:

1. Before sleeping, try doing an abdominal breathing exercise. Breathing from the abdomen helps to calm nerves and other organs in the body and makes you feel good.

2. Meditation has also been proven by those suffering from insomnia as an effective way to help people get a good night’s sleep.

3. Medical experts suggest a few minutes of quiet time to meditate before hitting the bed. Meditation not only helps calm the body, it also helps free the mind from unwanted clutter.

Originally posted 2012-06-01 13:52:25. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Can’t Sleep? How to get to sleep naturally without medication

Can’t get to sleep?

Are you spending hours tossing and turning dreading another day at work feeling tired and irritable?

If so, you’re not alone. As many as one in ten people suffers from chronic insomnia or a sleep disorder that keeps them awake into the early hours.

Stress, physical pain and anxiety are common causes. If you’re spending hours counting sheep it could also be due to a reaction to medication or injesting stimulants late at night, such as coffee, nicotine or alcohol.

Thankfully, insomnia is a medical condition that can be treated like any other. And I don’t mean reaching for the sleeping pills. Whilst medication can help in the short term, popping a pill every time you want to get to sleep can lead to an unhealthy reliance. A few late night beers also isn’t the answer. While alcohol can make you feel drowsy, it stops you from reaching the deep level of sleep you need to feel refreshed and rejuvenated the next day.

Instead, the best way to cure insomnia is to identify the root cause.

One way is to keep a sleep diary in which you record your night time habits. This could include what you had to eat or drink, what you were doing before going to bed or what you were thinking about when trying to sleep. That way you can spot patterns in your insomnia and identify what you need to change for more hours of snoozing and less hours of stressing.

It’s also a good idea to adopt good sleep hygiene habits.

Avoid watching TV in bed but instead listen to some relaxing music.

Have a long hot bath and try natural sleep remedies, like a banana or camomile tea, just before bedtime. These habits will help your mind and body to relax so you can drift off to the land of nod.

For more advice on how to get more hours of rejuvenating sleep each night and feel more energized and alert each day, visit helpmelseep.us – the home of natural sleep solutions

Originally posted 2014-02-09 15:01:13. Republished by Blog Post Promoter

Will Listening to Music Help Me Sleep?

Will music help me sleep? It’s a good question.

When you’re battling insomnia, you lie there for hours on end, getting agitated and worrying about being tired and crabby the next day. You may dread, yet again, missing the eight hours of sleep you need to be getting every night.

There’s a wide range of reasons why you might be suffering from the nighttime blues. It could be a reaction to medication, too many cups of coffee, troubling thoughts or a wide range of other reasons.

So the first step in battling insomnia is to try and identify what is stopping you from going to sleep at night. Introducing good sleep hygiene habits, such as going to sleep at the same time every night and avoiding stimulants late at night, is a also a wise step.

But if you’ve cut out the caffeine, haven’t been sat in bed working on your laptop and cant identify any psychological reason why you are still awake, it might be worth listening to some music a try.

How can music help me sleep?

To get to sleep, your mind and body has to be able to relax. If your mind is too active, worrying about things or being distracted, then it wont be able to go through the stages of relaxation needed to drift off to sleep.

There are a number of reasons why music can help you get to sleep at night:

1. Helps your body to relax

Along with your mind, your body has to be able to relax in order to get to sleep. This means your heart has to be able to beat at a slow, steady pace so that your muscles and body can relax.

Music can help if it is slow and matches the rhythm of a calm heart because it can subconsciously slow your breathing so that you reach a semi-meditative state and your muscles stop being tense and relax.

 2. Calms down an overactive mind

Have you ever noticed how your thoughts seem to become abstract and random just as your drifting off to sleep? This is your mind becoming relaxed. It stops focusing on the here and now, but instead delves into the chaos of the subconscious mind. To help your mind get there, it needs to be able to relax.

Adopting the practices used by meditators to relax their mind and body can be an effective way of overcoming insomnia.  Soft, relaxing music can enable you to calm the mind and to think in a less ‘present’ active state.

3. Blanket out background noise

If you live in a busy street, with noisy flatmates or family members watching the TV until late at night, background noise can be a real problem. Music can be helpful in providing a blanket of soft noise to replace the background sounds that might be keeping you awake.

Another option is to listen to ‘white noise’ that provides a continuous stream of sound. This can mask distracting background noise that’s disturbing you.

What sort of music can help me sleep?

Some of the music that helps people get to sleep includes Coldplay, Loreena McKennitt or even some downbeat ‘Dream’ trance music.

The best advice is to try calm instrumental music without any vocals. If there’s a singer in the song then it can distract your mind and stop it from relaxing. This could be because your brain has to subconsciously make sense of  the words.

Soft, soothing music without vocals is probably the best for helping your mind and body to relax. You could try listening to panpipes, something ambient (like the sound of crashing waves or rainfall) or maybe even classical music.

A study by the University of Toronto  found that music with slow rhythmic patterns created a meditative mood and slower brainwaves. It also found that classical music with this pattern helped people to get to sleep faster and for longer.

So if you’re wondering ‘what music can help me sleep? try some Bach or Beethoven to see if the scientists are right and that calming classical is great for sleep.

Originally posted 2012-12-05 21:33:00. Republished by Blog Post Promoter